Posts In Category

Conservation Areas

Inglis Falls near Owen Sound
Conservation Areas

Whenever I visit Inglis Falls near Owen Sound, I appreciate the beauty of the cedars and limestone. It is one of the most beautiful and interesting waterfalls in Ontario. Visiting Inglis Falls at any time of the year is always an awesome experience.  The waterfall is located south-west of the City of Owen Sound, where the Sydenham River meets the edge of the Niagara Escarpment. The Conservation Area and trails are well marked and the view through the canyon towards Owen Sound is fantastic. Margaret and I explored the trail down towards the bottom of the falls.  The Bruce Trail passes through the area heading north to Tobermory. There are many spots to stop for photographs.   History surrounding Inglis Falls The waterfall was named after a Scottish immigrant, Peter Inglis. He settled in the area around 1845. In 1862, Inglis replaced an old gristmill with a four-storey mill that produced

Read More
Hiking at Belfountain Conservation Area
Conservation Areas

One of the most beautiful places just north of Mississauga is the Hills and Headwaters area, which includes Belfountain Conservation Area and the Forks of the Credit Provincial Park. We’ve gone hiking at Belfountain Conservation Area several times,  and I have blogged about our drive through the town of Belfountain that inspired a summer visit. Our first visit was on a wintery day, with frozen roads and hiking trails. Our summer visit was completely different. If you’ve ever driven through Belfountain, you know how lovely it is, and how much fun it is to drive on the winding roads. It feel like are in a mountainous region of Europe. The Credit River sometimes accompanies you along on your route, and you drive and up and down steep, curvy roads. Belfountain Conservation Area is right in the village. During the spring, summer and fall seasons it is open to visitors with

Read More
Belwood Lake Conservation Area
Conservation Areas

The Belwood Lake Conservation Area is a reservoir in Dufferin County located northeast of Guelph, Ontario. In 1942 the Grand River waters were slowed by the erection of the Shand Dam for flood control and the generation of hydroelectricity. Belwood Lake Conservation Area, operated by the Grand River Conservation Authority offers a fantastic number of recreation opportunities. Hiking, biking, boating or just getting away to a quite spot on the Grand River on a lazy summer day, this is the place.   The Shand Dam was the first dam in Canada built for water control purposes. The dam was named after a local family who were displaced due to the waters of the reservoir. Visitors can stand on the top deck of the dam and see the Grand River valley to one side and the 12 kilometer (7.5 miles) long lake on the other. The flow from the dam is

Read More
Conservation Halton Parks
Conservation Areas

Since I was the age of 13, I have hiked and enjoyed Conservation Halton Parks. They offer many outdoor activities such as, boating, cross-country skiing, fishing, hiking and so much more. The best part is they are located just a short distance from major population centers. Conservation Halton owns and operates six conservation areas, including Crawford Lake, Mountsberg, Rattlesnake Point, Hilton Falls, Kelso and Mount Nemo. Crawford Lake Conservation Area This 468 hectare park has a meromictic lake and a 15th century reconstructed Iroquoian village is a interesting place to visit at all times of the year. My favourite hiking trail is the Woodland and Nassagaweya Trail.   Mountsberg Conservation and Wildlife Centre 472 hectare park with over 16 kilometers of nature trails, a 202 hectare water control reservoir and is home to the Mountsberg Raptor Centre. My favourite hiking trail is the Lakeshore Lookout Trail and visiting the various

Read More
Deer in Dundas Valley Ontario
Conservation Areas

The most incredible and unexpected brushes with nature will present themselves at times that are less than perfect. Mother Nature presented herself while Margaret and I were taking a drive through the Dundas Valley. I believe the six beautiful and healthy deer were moving through the valley looking for a safe place to stay for the evening.   I grabbed my camera and took off down a trail that would intersect the direction that they were headed. Feeling the rush come from seeing beautiful wild animals free has always been something I have found indescribable. I hope you enjoy the photographs that I was able to capture in the short period of time. It is still possible to see wild deer, turkeys and a multitude of other animals near suburban areas if you are in the right place, at the right time. Deer Spotting in Dundas Valley If you want

Read More